Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann
Hardcover, 338 pages
Published April 18th, 2017 by Doubleday

In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, the Osage rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.

Then, one by one, they began to be killed off. One Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, watched as her family was murdered. Her older sister was shot. Her mother was then slowly poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more Osage began to die under mysterious circumstances.

My thoughts…

A good nonfiction book that will read as fast as a good fiction book. This is a story of greed, but unfortunately, it didn’t stop there. It became murder. It tells not only of the killing spree against the Osage Indians, but the rise of the oil industry, the development of private detectives and the Bureau of Investigation (predecessor to the FBI) and the political corruption of the day.

Mollie Burkhart’s sister disappeared and was later found shot to death. The investigation into her death, also found a bombing and a string of poisonings that where all aimed at the wealthy Osage Indians. The Osage Indians benefited from the oil found on their land. The investigation would eventually expose an incredible conspiracy. This conspiracy involved anyone and everyone, as the Osage were being murdered. This included law men and lawmakers, all the way to Washington, as white men schemed to take control of the vast wealth the Osage were entitled to.

The history that unfolds in this book is riveting. It's a sad look back on the prejudices of the day, along with the numerous scandals. So many innocent lives lost, lies told, scandals and cover ups, it’s hard to keep count of it all. David Grann has done a wonderful job of investigating these murders of the 1920’s. I highly recommend this book to those who enjoy an enlightening nonfiction book.

4 comments:

  1. I have been really curious about this book. I am so glad to see that you enjoyed it. It does sound like a really interesting story that I could see myself enjoying. Great review!

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    1. Thanks Carole. I also purchased this book for my mother, she enjoyed it so much that she purchased it for two other people to read. It is really good.

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  2. I bought this but haven't read it yet! I need to get to it soon! Great review!!

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    1. Thanks Erica. This book was a book club read last year, and I missed that night. I'm glad that I finally did pick it up, it's worth the read.

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