11 June 2011

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom


The Kitchen House
by Kathleen Grissom
(Kindle Edition, Historical Fiction)

When a white servant girl violates the order of plantation society, she unleashes a tragedy that exposes the worst and best in the people she has come to call her family.

Orphaned while on board a ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Under the care of Belle, the master's illegitimate daughter, Lavinia becomes deeply bonded to her adopted family, though she is set apart from them by her white skin.

Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. Lavinia finds herself perilously straddling two very different worlds. When she is forced to make a choice, loyalties are brought into question, dangerous truths are laid bare, and lives are put at risk.

The Kitchen House is a tragic story of page-turning suspense, exploring the meaning of family, where love and loyalty prevail.

I really, really enjoyed The Kitchen House. It is a story of a little girl from Ireland, who has lost her parents during their voyage to America. The Captain of the ship brings her home to his plantation in the south, to pay off the debt of her parents she is indentured until she is eighteen years old. She is given to Belle, the slave who runs the kitchen and so the story unfolds of life in the Kitchen House.

This novel was a quick read, especially since the reader knows from the very beginning that there is a violent death coming. The characters are so well written that you care about them or really dislike them. At times the story is heartbreaking because the characters go through their share of hardships. It's not a happy book, but it's well worth the read.




1 comments:

  1. Thanks for the review, Jovi. :)

    I have Lisa Gardner's Love You More on my reading list. Looking forward to it.

    Currently reading Erica Spindler's Blood Vines. It also has strong female characters.

    Cheers
    Vicki

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